8 great articles in the ELT blogosphere this week

earthHere's a quick list of some of the great postings I read this week whilst out and about in the English language teaching/learning blogosphere:

  • Gavin Dudeney's musings sparked off a lively debate on the role of gender in ELT.
  • Johanna Stirling's encouraging TEFL teachers and language students to become involved in a literacy project: did you know that 90% of women and 80% of men are illiterate in Afghanistan?
  • Lindsay Clandfield has us day-dreaming of the year 2050, when finally we teachers will have nothing more to do but press a couple of buttons! Of course, that would end up meaning that Asimov was right. Sigh. (link from Scott Thornbury via Twitter).
Best,
Karenne

3 Responses to “8 great articles in the ELT blogosphere this week”

  • sixthings.net says:
    April 18, 2009

    Thanks Karenne for pointing these out! I had missed the Gavin Dudeney discussion completely!

  • The TEFL Tradesman says:
    April 19, 2009

    I like the piece in satire and irony - I just found the examples a little weak. But well done for bringing it to my eager attention, K.

  • vicki says:
    April 21, 2009

    Thanks for this Karenne. I enjoyed Carl Dowse's review alongwith the Barry Tomalin lecture.
    But I think the thing I enjoyed most were your comments on Carl's posting.:-)

 

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