Showing posts with label dogme-blog-challenge. Show all posts
Showing posts with label dogme-blog-challenge. Show all posts

Dogme Blog Challenge #10 The questions which continue to niggle...

and niggle...

Need a Spark?



For ten weeks we, as Educational bloggers, have explored the concepts and precepts of dogme together - we have enthusiastically shared our knowledge and experience, described what it has meant to us to adopt a student-centered approach to our language teaching and we've told thousands of others about how this practice has enriched our work and affected our classrooms.

But for this week (and for the next ones following until the end of the year) why don't we write posts which turn the tables on our readers, asking them about the questions they may still have...  or perhaps some of them will write their own questions telling us what it is that still niggles about dogme...

What stones have we left unturned?
And let's now listen deeply.

The Blog Posts Challenge #10
       
      Read previous Challenge blog posts:
      What is all this about? 
      The Dogme Blog Challenge + links to the blogs discussing Dogme
      The dogma of Dogme - background info & links
      Dogme ELT - other stuff I've written on Dogme


      How to share on Twitter:  use the #dogmeme hashtag

      How to share your fellow teachers' blog posts with each other?  Add/link to the blog(s) written on the subject on your post so they form a ring and your readers can travel on from post to post!

      How to respond?

      Comment below with short thoughts
      Go to your nearest yahoo!group and share your opinions
      with like-minded teaching colleagues

      Blog it:
      Write a list or tell a story, 
      compare lessons: dogme and non-dogme, 
      relate an experience, a contrary opinion,
      quote research, your own theory,
      submit mere musings, rant...
      share an idea, a paragraph, a dictionary's definition
      come up with a clever sentence,
      a beautiful photograph,

      a video-log
      an article or draft the bones of an essay, 
      share examples from your own classroom experience...

      In short, be dogmeic: personalize  your response!)




      Important URLs to quote/link to in your post (if necessary):
      • Teaching Unplugged: http://www.deltapublishing.co.uk/titles/methodology/teaching-unplugged
      • Scott Thornbury's website + articles: http://www.thornburyscott.com/
      • Scott Thornbury's blog: http://scottthornbury.wordpress.com/
      • Luke Meddings' blog: http://lukemeddings.wordpress.com/
      • Luke Meddings' on the Delta blog: http://www.deltapublishing.co.uk/author/luke-meddings
      • Dogme ELT in Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dogme_language_teaching

      Dogme Blog Challenge #9 Being Critical

      unplugged
      One of the greatest problems I have personally found, from an attempt years ago, to bring in the then topical subject of weapons of mass destruction into our classroom - the war in Iraq was gearing up  - was that politics can be a very dangerous and difficult discussion. 

      However, does it pay to always avoid the difficult?

      Do you believe that everything we read, write, watch or hear in the media is always true?   Have we ever been lied to or misled by those in positions of political authority?

      We know the answers to these questions lie in layers of greyness, layers which are often unpercievable by second language learners - yet how often do we challenge our students to think about these issues?

      Should we be teaching our students to think critically about the materials/opinions/news items we bring in to class with us?  That they bring in?

      What has been your experience - how have you handled critical thinking in your dogme classrooms?



      The Blog Posts Challenge #9
      This is a critical update by Diarmuid Fogarty
      Critical Thinking, we aim at it by Sabrina de Vita
      Thinking in a crisis by Candy von Ost
      A reflection on teaching critical thinking by Tyson Seburn


          Read previous Challenge blog posts:
          What is all this about? 
          The Dogme Blog Challenge + links to the blogs discussing Dogme
          The dogma of Dogme - background info & links
          Dogme ELT - other stuff I've written on Dogme


          How to share on Twitter:  use the #dogmeme hashtag

          How to share your fellow teachers' blog posts with each other?  Add/link to the blog(s) written on the subject on your post so they form a ring and your readers can travel on from post to post!

          How to respond?

          Comment below with short thoughts
          Go to your nearest yahoo!group and share your opinions
          with like-minded teaching colleagues

          Blog it:
          Write a list or tell a story, 
          compare lessons: dogme and non-dogme, 
          relate an experience, a contrary opinion,
          quote research, your own theory,
          submit mere musings, rant...
          share an idea, a paragraph, a dictionary's definition
          come up with a clever sentence,
          a beautiful photograph,

          a video-log
          an article or draft the bones of an essay, 
          share examples from your own classroom experience...

          In short, be dogmeic: personalize  your response!)




          Important URLs to quote/link to in your post (if necessary):
          • Teaching Unplugged: http://www.deltapublishing.co.uk/titles/methodology/teaching-unplugged
          • Scott Thornbury's website + articles: http://www.thornburyscott.com/
          • Scott Thornbury's blog: http://scottthornbury.wordpress.com/
          • Luke Meddings' blog: http://lukemeddings.wordpress.com/
          • Luke Meddings' on the Delta blog: http://www.deltapublishing.co.uk/author/luke-meddings
          • Dogme ELT in Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dogme_language_teaching

          Dogme Blog Challenge #8 Myth 3 - Some classrooms are just too "difficult" to dogme

          This one

          is the most widespread of all the myths...


          Somehow, for some very bizarre reason, whenever you talk to teachers who don't get dogme  
          (because they couldn't be bothered to research? stand to lose something?  love their textbooks too much to look at the folks in the room?)


          the words

          "well, dogme works for some classes, I suppose, but it won't work for mine because..."

          comes slipping out of their mouths with a sheepish grin...

           "See... the thing is (cough)

          14 plugs but only 6 sockets


          "I, er, teach..."    
          they'll continue...




          "young learners
              and they need order, structure, they won't know what to say



          50 students in one class
          how can I be expected to organize my classroom into smaller groups?! it's impossible




          Chinese students
           a cultural thing, see.. they're not a nation of talkers...


          English for Specialized Purposes
          all that technical vocabulary, I most surely have to know it all to teach them the jargon they deal with daily.. surely?


          on Moodle
          people need pop-up instructions to know what to do...







          My students want grammar... 
          and Dogme teachers never teach grammar


           My students want their textbooks
          and their workbook, CDrom, DVDrom, i-phone downloadable app, mousepad, pen...



          They're doing the TOEFL
          they've a lot of words to learn

          don't ya know...
           I'm a new teacher..."



          Uh, huh...

          Go on, Edu-bloggers, this is a special call for you to go on ahead and leave a trail forever:

          Explode this myth sky-high!



          Tell us how you work with all the above and any other excuses you've also heard:  show us how you  manage to keep your classrooms learner-centered, how you work with emergent language, how you provide scaffolding for all of these impossible classes... how you keep your students conversing despite all these "so-called difficulties" and provide them with quality education.



          The Blog Posts Challenge #8
               
              Other Related




              Read previous Challenge blog posts:
              What is all this about? 
              The Dogme Blog Challenge + links to the blogs discussing Dogme
              The dogma of Dogme - background info & links
              Dogme ELT - other stuff I've written on Dogme

              Note for those new to this challenge: Dogme is not anti-coursebook, please see this video if at all confused: (here)

              How to share on Twitter:  use the #dogmeme hashtag

              How to share your fellow teachers' blog posts with each other?  Don't forget to add a link to the blog(s) which have been written on the same subject on your own post so they form a ring and your readers can travel on from yours to the other responding blogs.

              How to respond?

              Comment below with short thoughts
              Go to your nearest yahoo!group and share your opinions
              with like-minded teaching colleagues

              Blog it:
              Write a list or tell a story, 
              compare lessons: dogme and non-dogme, 
              relate an experience, a contrary opinion,
              quote research, your own theory,
              submit mere musings, rant...
              share an idea, a paragraph, a dictionary's definition
              come up with a clever sentence,
              a beautiful photograph,

              a video-log
              an article or draft the bones of an essay, 
              share examples from your own classroom experience...

              In short, be dogmeic: personalize  your response!)




              Important URLs to quote/link to in your post (if necessary):
              • Teaching Unplugged: http://www.deltapublishing.co.uk/titles/methodology/teaching-unplugged
              • Scott Thornbury's website + articles: http://www.thornburyscott.com/
              • Scott Thornbury's blog: http://scottthornbury.wordpress.com/
              • Luke Meddings' blog: http://lukemeddings.wordpress.com/
              • Luke Meddings' on the Delta blog: http://www.deltapublishing.co.uk/author/luke-meddings
              • Dogme ELT in Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dogme_language_teaching

              Dogme Blog Challenge #7 Myth 2, Dogme ELT = No Technology..?

              ~ what none?







              so what's all this then...
              this Dogme 2.0?

                




              Explode the myth.


              The Blog Posts Challenge #7

                  Read previous Challenge blog posts:
                  What is all this about? 
                  The Dogme Blog Challenge + links to the blogs discussing Dogme
                  The dogma of Dogme - background info & links
                  Dogme ELT - other stuff I've written on Dogme


                  How to share on Twitter:  use the #dogmeme hashtag

                  How to share your fellow teachers' blog posts with each other?  Add/link to the blog(s) written on the subject on your post so they form a ring and your readers can travel on from post to post!

                  hat tip for this amazing image:  Maricarmen Gamero which was downloaded from: http://www.fondosgratis.com.mx/

                  yes... really, that's it. 
                  I didn't press publish by accident... y'all  know what to do :) :)

                  Dogme Blog Challenge #6 Exploding the Myths 1 "NNESTS can't do dogme"

                  Unplugged
                  Teacher, you got it wrong:
                  by Christina Chang, Taiwan

                   
                  Oh, No, Teacher, you got it all wrong.


                  Oh, No, Teacher, you got it all wrong.





                  I just realized how we never learned to think in English
                  and why we could not write in English without fear of making mistakes.

                  Hate: when you introduced the word 'hate' to me
                  in English, you were in such a hurry to show me
                  that it was a verb, a transtive verb but it could also be intranstive
                  and the past tense looked like 'hated' and
                  the past participle was also such and such and you moved on
                  to write on the board the tricky "hatred"-noun of 'hate' -
                  not to be confused with 'hated' and then the adjective of 'hate'.
                  And You yourself never did tell us one thing
                  you hated in your life. Not one thing. There was no time.

                  It was when I read Seymour Papert, a renowned scholar at MIT,
                  through the Internet, writing how he grew up
                  in South Africa . . .

                  "I grew up in South Africa and one thing
                  I learned to hate was all forms of segregation . . ."

                  He went on and on, saying what and why he hated . . .

                  It was then that I relearned the word 'hate' and
                  I picked up the word 'segregation' so surely without looking up
                  in a dictionary. No need to.

                  I then learned to say . . .

                  I hate, growing up, being taught English in Taiwan
                  by teachers, who could not say what they hated and I became
                  stuttered in English and not knowing why . . .

                  I hate the segregation of Native and Non-Nativeness;
                  I hate the blind fear you harbor in yourself secretly and carefully
                  about using English . . . yeah, not to lose face
                  I hate that you did not use English to communicate
                  anything about yourself, about your feelings and thoughts and
                  We never got to do so and learned how it is to say
                  "I hate" in English.

                  You did teach 'Grammar' and "Rules'
                  as if they were the only guarantees that would save me
                  against 'losing face' or 'losing out' -- in exams.
                  But do you see what we might lose in life's journey
                  Beyond winning exams and saving faces?

                  I hate that people around me are trying to make me into
                  someone like you, make me believe that we could only
                  be someone like you,

                  Who are willing to judge and be judged by
                  grammar and rules all throughout their lives of using English
                  because of the segregation of Native and Non-Nativeness.

                  Oh, No, Teacher, you got it all wrong.

                  I've found my voice in English. Have you found yours?
                  In life's long journey, I know I have won my share of using English
                  without fear of segregation. 


                  found in the dogme yahoo group, 2005  



                  In a world approaching 2 billion English language learners, one third of the planet's population, there are give or take, 4 million TEFL teachers in the world at any one time.   

                  Unquestionably, most English teachers in the world are actually non-native speakers of English.
                   

                  1. Some critics of the Dogme approach have suggested that only native-speaker teachers can feel fully comfortable in this unplanned teaching mode.  A Dogme approach can sound high risk, involving snap decisions and an intuitive feel for both accuracy and appropriacy - the kinds of skills often associated with (experienced) native-speaker teachers.   Luke Meddings & Scott Thornbury, Teaching Unplugged, Delta Teacher Development Series, 2009.

                  What do you think?  Are Non Native English Speaking teachers disadvantaged?

                  2. What role does a knowledge of the home culture play in the creation and execution of dogme in the classroom? 

                  3. If language is seen through the eyes and voice of the learners, how might this not be transmitted through a Native English Speaking teacher?  If you are a NNEST reading this blog post, what do you bring to your classroom that, in your opinion, a NEST cannot?

                  4. Is language teaching about creating perfect models of expression?   As a NEST, what are your advantages in approaching your classes Dogmeically that, in your opinion, your NNEST colleagues may not have?

                  5. Or is there any arrogance in the perceived notions that someone who was not born in a native English speaking country has a somewhat lesser level of English?  Is this a truth?  


                  Explode the myth.



                  The Blog Posts Challenge #6

                      Read previous Challenge blog posts:
                      What is all this about? 
                      The Dogme Blog Challenge + links to the blogs discussing Dogme
                      The dogma of Dogme - background info & links
                      Dogme ELT - other stuff I've written on Dogme

                      Important Link for NNESTs
                      TESOL http://nnest.asu.edu/
                      http://nnesintesol.blogspot.com/

                      How to share on Twitter:  use the #dogmeme hashtag - if you're not on Twitter, email me your link or add it below :-)

                      How to share your fellow teachers' blog posts with each other?  Add/link to the blog(s) written on the subject on your post so they form a ring and your readers can travel on from post to post!

                      How to respond?

                      Comment below with short thoughts
                      Go to your nearest yahoo!group and share your opinions
                      with like-minded teaching colleagues

                      Blog it:
                      Write a list or tell a story, 
                      compare lessons: dogme and non-dogme, 
                      relate an experience, a contrary opinion,
                      quote research, your own theory,
                      submit mere musings, rant...
                      share an idea, a paragraph, a dictionary's definition
                      come up with a clever sentence,
                      a beautiful photograph,

                      a video-log
                      an article or draft the bones of an essay, 
                      share examples from your own classroom experience...

                      In short, be dogmeic: personalize  your response!)




                      Important URLs to quote/link to in your post (if necessary):
                      • Teaching Unplugged: http://www.deltapublishing.co.uk/titles/methodology/teaching-unplugged
                      • Scott Thornbury's website + articles: http://www.thornburyscott.com/
                      • Scott Thornbury's blog: http://scottthornbury.wordpress.com/
                      • Luke Meddings' blog: http://lukemeddings.wordpress.com/
                      • Luke Meddings' on the Delta blog: http://www.deltapublishing.co.uk/author/luke-meddings
                      • Dogme ELT in Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dogme_language_teaching

                      Dogme Blog Challenge #5 Speak, Voice

                      Providing space for the learners' voice means 

                      accepting that the learners'

                      beliefs
                      knowledge
                      experiences
                      concerns
                      & desires

                      are valid content in the language learning classroom.

                      Luke Meddings & Scott Thornbury, Teaching Unplugged, Delta Teacher Development Series, 2009.

                      Sink plug



                      Although this essential theme has come up and written about already in the 40 + blog posts written so far in this dogme blog challenge, it is so incredibly important - it is, in my humble opinion, it is the very core of dogme... so we're going to hone in

                      on this

                      one

                      incredible word:


                      Voice.




                      Whenever we refer to someone as having a voice what do we actually mean?  

                      • David R Hall says that students know what their own needs and interests are.  Do they?  How do we or they provide/ utilize materials to encourage their voices to come out, to tell us this?  How do we build meaning together, while we're supporting the sound of it... how do we listen to the stories of 'the people in the room?'  
                      • In your opinion, how can we create an environment where a degree of equality between participants blurs questions of status and social distance?  How can we ensure that all of our students are actually heard? By whom?  Do you think this is, actually, really possible?  Have you been in situations where this would prove impossible?  In your opinion, are people in general really interested in hearing about each other or only themselves?  
                      • Do you think emotional intelligence plays any kind of role in cultivating voice in our classrooms?
                      • Are their English voices ever different from their L1 voices?  If you yourself speak an L2, are you the same person when you're communicating in this other language - in what way do you think you change? 


                      Best,
                      Karenne

                      -p.s  If you're a blogger reading my page... how did you discover your writing voice?  Was it a conscious development or did it simply emerge?

                      -p.p.s a special huge thank you to the global bloggers who have already taken part in this incredible challenge: I am learning so much from all of you and at our halfway point I just really wanted to let you  know that it has been just incredible how you have opened up your classroom doors and let us all in, to see, to learn:  you've not only shared time and energy with us, your random readers, but you have given us the gift of your experience and you have imparted on us your invaluable knowledge.

                      I know that I personally have been challenged by this amazing community of teaching practioners: I have been tickled, provoked, delighted, interested, absorbed, excited to try out the new things I've read on your pages - in short, entranced by your voices.

                      And we've still got five more to go!!!  Coming up: NNEST and dogme; the so-called-difficult classes; dogme&technology; critical pedagogy/critical thinking...




                      The Blog Posts Challenge #5

                          Read previous Challenge blog posts:
                          Read next in the challenge
                            What is all this about? 
                            The Dogme Blog Challenge + links to the blogs discussing Dogme
                            The dogma of Dogme - background info & links
                            Dogme ELT - other stuff I've written on Dogme


                            How to share on Twitter:  use the #dogmeme hashtag

                            How to share your fellow teachers' blog posts with each other?  Please don't forget to add/link to the other blog(s) written on the subject on your own post so that they can form a ring and your readers can travel on from your post to the next one!

                            How to respond?

                            Comment below with short thoughts
                            Go to your nearest yahoo!group and share your opinions
                            with like-minded teaching colleagues

                            Blog it:
                            Write a list or tell a story, 
                            compare lessons: dogme and non-dogme, 
                            relate an experience, a contrary opinion,
                            quote research, your own theory,
                            submit mere musings, rant...
                            share an idea, a paragraph, a dictionary's definition
                            come up with a clever sentence,
                            a beautiful photograph,

                            a video-log
                            an article or draft the bones of an essay, 
                            share examples from your own classroom experience...

                            In short, be dogmeic: personalize  your response!)




                            Important URLs to quote/link to in your post (if necessary):
                            • Teaching Unplugged: http://www.deltapublishing.co.uk/titles/methodology/teaching-unplugged
                            • Scott Thornbury's website + articles: http://www.thornburyscott.com/
                            • Scott Thornbury's blog: http://scottthornbury.wordpress.com/
                            • Luke Meddings' blog: http://lukemeddings.wordpress.com/
                            • Luke Meddings' on the Delta blog: http://www.deltapublishing.co.uk/author/luke-meddings
                            • Luke Meddings' on Dogme and Identity: http://www.deltapublishing.co.uk/development/dogme-and-identity
                            • Dogme ELT in Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dogme_language_teaching

                            Dogme Blog Challenge #4 Being Light

                            Dogme is about teaching 

                            materials light.



                            Luke Meddings & Scott Thornbury, Teaching Unplugged, Delta Teacher Development Series, 2009.
                             
                            Four Unplugged


                            What does it mean to us as teachers to go into a classroom materials-light? 
                            Where should all these  light materials magically come from?  
                            What do you think that Paulo Freire meant when he said that liberating education consists of acts of cognition, not transferrals of information?  Does going in light, as opposed to heavy, change this?  And, what in your opinion, might teaching materials-heavy look like?
                            How could teachers approach teaching with coursebooks dogmeicly*?
                            In Meeting of Minds, Stuart McNaughton challenges us with the idea of 'a curriculum that promotes only segmented, isolated, and elemental learning tasks reduces the students' degree of learning (including incedental learning) and also their preparedness for future learning.'   Have you seen this?  Felt it?  How do your students cope when the real-life need to speak in English crops up in their lives: can textbooks ever prepare them adequately for these experiences? Can being light?
                            Thinking about your colleagues and staffrooms along with your classrooms - do you think it is the teachers or students who favour most grammar based curriculums?  For either, why? Do we need to unlearn them?



                            The Blog Posts Challenge #4
                                Read previous Challenge blog posts:
                                Read Next in the Challenge series

                                Since its inception, Dogme has had the reputation of being a movement whose goal it is, if not actually to burn coursebooks, at least to banish them from the classroom, along with any other materials and technological aids that teachers now take for granted.  But it is worth emphasising at this point that a Dogme approach is not anti-materials nor anti-technology per se. What it rejects are those kinds of materials and aids that don't conform with the principles of Dogme.   (Meddings L. & Thornbury S., Teaching Unplugged, 2009)

                                 Video with Scott Thornbury:

























                                What is all this about? 
                                The Dogme Blog Challenge + links to the blogs discussing Dogme
                                The dogma of Dogme - background info & links
                                Dogme ELT - other stuff I've written on Dogme

                                How to share on Twitter:  use the #dogmeme hashtag

                                How to share your fellow teachers' blog posts with each other?  Add/link to the blog(s) written on the subject on your post so they form a ring and your readers can travel on from post to post!

                                How to respond?

                                Comment below with short thoughts
                                Go to your nearest yahoo!group and share your opinions
                                with like-minded teaching colleagues

                                Blog it:
                                Write a list or tell a story, 
                                compare lessons: dogme and non-dogme, 
                                relate an experience, a contrary opinion,
                                quote research, your own theory,
                                submit mere musings, rant...
                                share an idea, a paragraph, a dictionary's definition
                                come up with a clever sentence,
                                a beautiful photograph,

                                a video-log
                                an article or draft the bones of an essay, 
                                share examples from your own classroom experience...

                                In short, be dogmeic: personalize  your response!)




                                Important URLs to quote/link to in your post (if necessary):
                                • Dogme myths 
                                • Teaching Unplugged: http://www.deltapublishing.co.uk/titles/methodology/teaching-unplugged
                                • Scott Thornbury's website + articles: http://www.thornburyscott.com/
                                • Scott Thornbury's blog: http://scottthornbury.wordpress.com/
                                • Luke Meddings' blog: http://lukemeddings.wordpress.com/
                                • Luke Meddings' on the Delta blog: http://www.deltapublishing.co.uk/author/luke-meddings
                                • Dogme ELT in Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dogme_language_teaching

                                disclaimer: dogmeic and dogmeicly aren't words. I made them up.

                                  Dogme Blog Challenge #3 The Scaffolding

                                  The teacher's primary function, 

                                  apart from promoting the kind of classroom dynamic 
                                  conducive to a dialogic and emergent pedagogy 
                                  is to optimize language learning affordances,
                                  by directing attention to features of the emergent language;

                                  learning can be mediated through talk, 
                                  especially talk that is shaped and supported 
                                  (i.e. scaffolded) by the teacher.

                                  Luke Meddings & Scott Thornbury, Teaching Unplugged, Delta Teacher Development Series, 2009.

                                  What do you mean "Unplugged"? 20081012_0809ed


                                  Who coined the term "scaffolding" to describe the co-construction of learning between learners and teachers?  What was he trying to say through this?   
                                  In your opinion, what do you think  it means to optimize language learning affordances?

                                  Michael Long encourages us to focus on form, (1991) to draw our students' attention to linguistic elements as they arise incidentally in communication, to redress the weaknesses our language learners make and to help them to notice these - which requires the teacher to do more than simply provide the conditions of language to emerge: their language must be scrutinised, manipulated, personalised and practised; Nick Ellis suggests that 'by making the underlying patterns more salient' (1997) acquisition can be facilitated.

                                  That is to say, if learners are having trouble identifying and abstracting patterns, seeing or understanding form, then their attention can be purposefully directed at them.

                                  How?  Why is this different from teaching with grammar McNuggets?

                                  What strategies do you generally apply in your language teaching classrooms to keep your own students focused on their own particular areas of individual concern?   What techniques work best?

                                  Answer in the comments below or if you happen to have a blog, do write your own post explaining how this affects you and your work as an English language teacher.

                                  And by the way, have really enjoyed travelling through the 'sphere, reading the posts and converations so far and am very much looking forward to learning from and sharing even more with you!

                                  Karenne


                                  The Blog Posts Challenge #3
                                    Read previous Challenge blog posts:
                                    Read Next in the Challenge series


                                      What is all this about? 
                                      The Dogme Blog Challenge + links to the blogs discussing Dogme
                                      The dogma of Dogme - background info & links
                                      Dogme ELT - other stuff I've written on Dogme
                                      S is for Scaffolding by Scott Thornbury

                                      How to share on Twitter:  use the #dogmeme hashtag

                                      How to share your fellow teachers' blog posts with each other?  Add/link to the blog(s) written on the subject on your post so they form a ring and your readers can travel on from post to post!

                                      How to respond?

                                      Comment below with short thoughts
                                      Go to your nearest yahoo!group and share your opinions
                                      with like-minded teaching colleagues

                                      Blog it:
                                      Write a list or tell a story, 
                                      compare lessons: dogme and non-dogme, 
                                      relate an experience, a contrary opinion,
                                      quote research, your own theory,
                                      submit mere musings, rant...
                                      share an idea, a paragraph, a dictionary's definition
                                      come up with a clever sentence,
                                      a beautiful photograph,

                                      a video-log
                                      an article or draft the bones of an essay, 
                                      share examples from your own classroom experience...

                                      In short, be dogmeic: personalize  your response!)




                                      Important URLs to quote/link to in your post (if necessary):
                                      • Teaching Unplugged: http://www.deltapublishing.co.uk/titles/methodology/teaching-unplugged
                                      • Scott Thornbury's website + articles: http://www.thornburyscott.com/
                                      • Scott Thornbury's blog: http://scottthornbury.wordpress.com/
                                      • Luke Meddings' blog: http://lukemeddings.wordpress.com/
                                      • Luke Meddings' on the Delta blog: http://www.deltapublishing.co.uk/author/luke-meddings
                                      • Dogme ELT in Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dogme_language_teaching

                                      Dogme Blog Challenge #2 It's Emergent?

                                      If learners are supplied with optimal conditions for language use

                                      and are motivated to take advantage of these opportunities, 

                                      their inherent learning capacities will be activated, 

                                      and language - rather than being acquired - will emerge.

                                      Luke Meddings & Scott Thornbury, Teaching Unplugged, Delta Teacher Development Series, 2009.

                                      A Spark of Bokeh

                                      What does this sentence mean to you?  Do you understand what it means for language to be emergent?   Can something come out of nothing?

                                      Answer in the comments below or if you happen to have a blog, do write your own post explaining how this affects you and your work as an English language teacher by answering any of the questions or something entirely of your own creation...

                                      • In your own experience, what are the optimal conditions for language use?   Does your classroom look like that?  Why/why not?
                                      • What are some of the psychological factors which tend to motivate the general population?   Do you ever apply these needs to your language teaching practice?  Which and how?
                                      • Critics of a dogme approach are quick to seize on its apparent lack of structure or methodological rigour.  In your own personal opinion, how can it qualify as sound practice if so much is left up to chance?
                                      • Do you believe that we humans have an inherent capacity to learn? And to learn languages? Can you give any examples of something you or your students learned by themselves - stuff which had nothing to do with the materials you were using, your classroom (or the teachers before you)?  Why did you/they learn?  Or conversely, can you show how the materials you've been using are directly key to the language ability they now have today?
                                      • Read these quotes:  Any attempt to control the selection and sequencing of syllabus items would be most likely to interfere with learning, since, given the state of our knowlede, it could only be appropriate by chance (Allwright, 1979).  Speech cannot be taught directly but "emerges" on its own as a result of building competence via comprehensible input (Krashen, 1985).  And, not finally,  Paulo Freire said: the class is not a class in the traditonal sense but a meeting-place where knowledge is sought and not where it is transmitted.   
                                      How do you teach at the moment?  Do you think that it is necessary to provide your learners with all the language they need to communicate in English or can you enable them to discover any/all the words they need themselves?   How?  If you disagree, why?  If you are using a course book at the moment do you think that there is a way to create "appropriate" opportunities for language use?  How?




                                      Looking forward to learning and sharing with you!

                                      Karenne


                                      The Blog Posts Challenge #2
                                      Read previous Challenge blog posts:
                                      Read Next in the Challenge series



                                        What is all this about? 
                                        The Dogme Blog Challenge + links to the blogs discussing Dogme
                                        The dogma of Dogme


                                        How to share on Twitter:  use the #dogmeme hashtag
                                        How to share your fellow teachers' blog posts with each other?  Add/link to the blog(s) written on the subject on your post so they form a ring and your readers can travel on from post to post!


                                        How to respond?

                                        Comment below with short thoughts
                                        Go to your nearest yahoo!group and share your opinions
                                        with like-minded teaching colleagues

                                        Blog it:
                                        Write a list or tell a story, 
                                        compare lessons: dogme and non-dogme, 
                                        relate an experience, a contrary opinion,
                                        quote research, your own theory,
                                        submit mere musings, rant...
                                        share an idea, a paragraph, a dictionary's definition
                                        come up with a clever sentence,
                                        a beautiful photograph,

                                        a video-log
                                        an article or draft the bones of an essay, 
                                        share examples from your own classroom experience...

                                        In short, be dogmeic: personalize  your response!)




                                        Important URLs to quote/link to in your post if necessary:
                                        • Teaching Unplugged: http://www.deltapublishing.co.uk/titles/methodology/teaching-unplugged
                                        • Scott Thornbury's website + articles: http://www.thornburyscott.com/
                                        • Scott Thornbury's blog: http://scottthornbury.wordpress.com/
                                        • Luke Meddings' blog: http://lukemeddings.wordpress.com/
                                        • Luke Meddings' on the Delta blog: http://www.deltapublishing.co.uk/author/luke-meddings
                                        • Dogme ELT in Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dogme_language_teaching

                                        Dogme Blog Challenge #1 Co-construction

                                        Materials-mediated teaching is the 'scenic' route to learning, 

                                        but the direct route 
                                        is located in the interactivity between teachers and learners, and between the learners themselves.

                                        Learning is a social and dialogic process, 
                                        where knowledge is co-constructed 
                                        rather than transmitted or imported 
                                        from teacher/coursebook to learner.

                                        Luke Meddings & Scott Thornbury, Teaching Unplugged, Delta Teacher Development Series, 2009.

                                        Plug and Play


                                        What does that mean to you?

                                        Answer in the comments below or if you happen to have a blog, do write your own post explaining how this affects you and your work as an English language teacher.

                                        • What is the 'scenic' route?  Why do Meddings and Thornbury suggest that materials-mediated teaching practice provides this?  Is there a subtext to what they're trying to communicate to us?
                                        • Why do Meddings and Thornbury suggest that the direct route to learning is, in fact, located in interactivity?
                                        • In your opinion, what do you think interactivity is - between teachers and learners?  And between learners themselves?  How do these differ?  Should they differ?
                                        • In your opinion is there any such thing as a direct route to language learning? Why, why not?
                                        • Do you think that learning is a social and dialogic process?  Justify your position or argue against.
                                        • Is knowledge co-constructed? What does it mean, exactly, to co-construct knowledge?


                                        How to respond?

                                        (Write a list or tell a story, 
                                        compare lessons: dogme and non-dogme, 
                                        relate an experience, a contrary opinion,
                                        quote research, your own theory,
                                        submit mere musings, rant...
                                        share an idea, a paragraph, a dictionary's definition
                                        come up with a clever sentence,
                                        a beautiful photograph,
                                        a video-log
                                        an article or draft the bones of an essay, 
                                        share examples from your own classroom experience...
                                        In short, be dogmeic: personalize  your response!)


                                        Can't wait to read your posts!
                                        Karenne


                                        What is this about?  Read here
                                        How to share your post on Twitter: Please add the hashtag #DBC_01  #dogmeme

                                        How to share your fellow teachers' blog posts with each other?  Add/link to the blog(s) written on the subject on your post so they form a ring and your readers can travel on from post to post!

                                        URLS which may be useful for your post
                                        • Teaching Unplugged: http://www.deltapublishing.co.uk/titles/methodology/teaching-unplugged
                                        • Scott Thornbury's website + articles: http://www.thornburyscott.com/
                                        • Scott Thornbury's blog: http://scottthornbury.wordpress.com/
                                        • Luke Meddings' blog: http://lukemeddings.wordpress.com/
                                        • Luke Meddings' on the Delta blog: http://www.deltapublishing.co.uk/author/luke-meddings
                                        • Dogme ELT in Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dogme_language_teaching
                                        You can travel through each blog post easily via Furly (see orange navigation bar at the top of page)

                                        Blog posts
                                        Is this dogme? by Candy Von Ost
                                        Interactivity and co-construction by Cecilia  Coehlo
                                        What really matters? Our students by Sabrina de Vita
                                        Interactivity and co-construction by Willy C. Cardosa
                                        Dogme days by Diarmuid Fogarty
                                        The importance of pair work by Nick Jaworski
                                        No dogma for EFL by Jeremy Harmer
                                        A response, by Andrew Pickles
                                        Dogme for all, by Richard Whiteside
                                        Where I stand on dogme by Natasa Grojic (also #4+#5)

                                        Other challenges
                                        Challenge #2 It's emergent?
                                        Challenge #3 The scaffolding 
                                        Challenge #4 Being Light 
                                        Challenge #5 The Learners Voice
                                        Challenge #6 NNEST vs NESTs

                                        The Dogme Challenge: Introduction

                                        The other day, Jeremy Harmer wrote the following on Andrew Pickle's blog post:



                                        Plug Face - Day 3/365
                                        Andrew,
                                        Nice lesson. Good use of vocabulary and students’ imagination.
                                        Course I don’t want to rile Luke and Scott (again!!) ,but is it Dogme, really? If people were doing this kind of thing before the Swedish film makers published their manifesto, can you still give it that name?
                                        But it does show what can be done successfully with very little.
                                        Jeremy



                                        I've seen this sort of comment before, a lot.  And it's not that Jeremy is wrong, that this sort of "lesson" even with the google-fight (post-manifesto) hasn't been done before, it's that who cares?   If you're teaching dogmeically then there will always be someone, somewhere out there who wants to sagely say, that dogme existed before dogme existed.

                                        Yup...

                                        it did.

                                        And before the i-phone, smartphones were a-plenty (as were tablets before the i-pad and portable mp3 music devices before the i-pod).  

                                        Before Crocs, garden shoes existed.  Everywhere, only they were green and there weren't a clog with holes nor made of foam and plastic. 

                                        The Kalinago populated and ruled the Caribbean before it was ever named the West of India.
                                        Sunglasses before Ray-bans.
                                        Vacumn cleaners before Hoover.
                                        Anti-Art before Dadaism.


                                        The BRAND name of a thing is not the thing.   Distracts but also adds.  I mean an i-phone is an i-phone after all.  

                                        But this is hardly the point, whether or not (sigh) Dogme is an approach or a methodology or a style or a fad or the fool's way out.... it actually doesn't matter what the thing is called, it was named so by Thornbury  in an apparently uncharacteristic rant against the world of ELT but like all things in life, once a thing has a name it has a life.

                                        Can you imagine students actually giving a crap about what you call the way you teach?   

                                        I think the main point for them is whether or not they walked out of their lessons with you with a higher level of English communicative skills than when they walked in.  And that is the singular goal of conversation-driven teaching.

                                        Andrew Pickles shared with us a great lesson plan for a lesson which no doubt didn't have a plan until he wrote it down and I understand this completely - I had the same problem, recently, when writing a case-study based on a 20 week course with five groups which I'd done in a mix of dogme and dogme 2.0 - the question of how on earth could I lesson-plan backwards in order to extract and tell what occured, what emerged in my classes..?   The mind boggles but I did do it (more on that later).

                                        The thing is that to share the "experience" of dogme sometimes you've got to share the experience.


                                        So, anyway, folks I have an idea...

                                        From tomorrow and every Thursday for the next 10 weeks, I am going to lay down a challenge where we will attempt together to take a deeper look into some of the specific points Meddings and Thornbury have been trying to teach us through their book Teaching Unplugged.  

                                        Perhaps it'll turn into yet another polemic discussion akin to why Acer is better than Apple (any day, hands down) or maybe this time instead we'll focus: unravel the knots, discover the gold, think about what separates a dogme class from a non dogme class, what really matters in the real classroom and teaching practice rather than mere theories of what it couldn't be before it had a brand and we'll attempt to challenge ourselves to teach in ways which are ever more student-centered, regardless of the name(s) we want to use.

                                        You are a blogger:
                                        After each challenge, write a blog post answering the question(s) I put forth.  Then you can  DM or email me (see the side bar) with the specific URL to your own blog post(s) or link back here (the trackback will show up at the bottom of the post) so that we can all travel on to your work in a so-called "dogme blog ring." 
                                        I'll try to provide you with instructions of who to link on to (who was before and after you) but you can also keep track of this through the 'sphere and 'verse.

                                        You are not a blogger but you are part of a forum/ ELT discussion group of any description:
                                        Take my question into your forum and ask your fellow members what they think about each question.   Email me a link to the forum or a summary of what's been said so that we can post responses anonymously (if you/they want to).



                                        You are not a blogger and you don't participate in groups:
                                        Answer the question posed in each post, either in the comments of each blog challenge (if you feel like it) and then visit the blog posts on this subject within the 'sphere and agree or disagree with what the bloggers have written!

                                        Sounds fun?

                                        Talk to you tomorrow,
                                        Karenne


                                        Blog posts on teaching Dogme
                                        The dogma of Dogme
                                        My own musings and guest-posts from other bloggers
                                        Dogme2.0-style teaching tips

                                         Other related
                                        Sue Lyon-Jones on Ken Wilson, on teaching the unteachable
                                        Emma Herrod, Failing to plan is planning to fail?
                                        Darren Elliot, an interview with Scott Thornbury

                                        and of course, D is for Dogme by Scott Thornbury and Luke Meddings, Dogme and Identity

                                        Videos:
                                        Scott Thornbury on the Myths of Dogme

                                        Challenges:
                                        Co-construction? #1 
                                        It's emergent? #2
                                        The scaffolding #3
                                        Being Light #4 
                                        The Learners' Voice #5
                                        NNESTs vs NESTs #6

                                        Miscellaneous
                                        ELTchat 20 October 2010
                                        Merchandising gimmicks for dogme teachers by Lindsay Clandfield
                                        And...a little light relief or inspiration














                                         

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